By Hank Tester

MIAMI (CBSMiami) — In November, two things happen in Florida. The weather changes and the time changes.

Florida voters seemed to like the idea of no more wintertime dark at 5:30 with year-round daylight saving maybe golf or a jog after work….In the daylight. But this Sunday once again the clock goes back an hour of sleep is gained and dark will come quick.

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In 2018, the Florida Sunshine Protection Act was passed in the Florida legislature with overwhelming support for year-round Daylight Savings Time, but the way the law was written makes it so that change can only happen if a federal version is passed and signed into law.

Scott Yates, who heads an organization called “Lock the Clock,” says, “Florida was really the leader in this thing, but it has gotten stalled at the U.S. Congress.”

Florida voters seemed to like the idea of no more wintertime dark at 5:30 p.m. 

So, those dreaming of playing golf, taking a walk or a jog after work in the light of day, won’t be able to do it and once again, the clock goes back an hour and an hour of sleep is lost.

“For most people, in almost every state, the most popular choice by far is to have the summertime be the new standard time,” Yates told CBSMiami.

Well, maybe a nationwide AP-NORC poll from late 2019 shows 40% yearn for standard time all year around.

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Thirty-two percent of Americans wanted to move to Daylight Savings Time all year around. Twenty-eight percent want to keep switching back and forth. So, a majority of Americans are tired of switching time twice a year.  

Yates is a crusader taking his “Lock the Clock” campaign to state Capitols across the nation. In the last four years, 19 states have enacted legislation or passed resolutions to provide for year-round Daylight Savings Time.

“Florida was the first state to pass this bill, went through the legislature and got signed by the governor, but it wasn’t the last. Daylight savings advocates in those states hoping that legislation in the U.S. Senate Commerce Committee will go forward, though it is doubtful even with Florida Senator Marco Rubio as a champion, as congress is mired in a huge political fight over infrastructure,” said Yates.

In the last four years, 19 states have enacted legislation or passed resolutions to provide for year-round Daylight Savings Time.

Yates said we do need Congress to act but the president could also enact Year-around daylight savings.

“The president has the power to order the Department of Transportation to say what we call “Summer Time” become the new standard time. He could do it without potentially asking Congress, but probably it would be best if Congress acted, it is such a big deal.”

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Meanwhile, this Sunday morning at 2 a.m. clocks will be set back an hour and the clock still ticking on Florida’s year-round Daylight Savings Time.