By Dave Warren

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – This Friday, October 15th, marks the end of the rainy season here in South Florida.

Starting May 15, the weather here typically has daily storms which at times can contain flooding downpours. This time of year, however, our weather pattern changes along with our forecasts.

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“Typically, as meteorologists when we think of rainy season, we look for a day when it won’t rain. During the dry season, we look for a day when it will rain, rain is the exception,” said CBS4 Chief Meteorologist Craig Setzer.

Dry days are limited during the wet season since we normally see 70 percent of our yearly rainfall in those five months. It often starts out stormy, peaks with flooding downpours, and can end just after the peak of hurricane season.

Over the next few months what typically makes big weather news are cold fronts.

“One of the benefits of dry season is the cold fronts, we see the reinforcement of the dry air and a break in the temperatures,” said Setzer.

Even though it may lead to a chilly morning or two, a sunny and mild day is a nice break from the hot and humid weather we have dealt with over the last five months. Although nice, the drier weather does take a toll on the South Florida landscape. From March up until the start of rainy season we get a brief wildfire season.

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This wet season has been about average. Miami saw slightly above average rainfall while Fort Lauderdale was a few inches below normal.

“As I look out over the flood control system right now, we’re exactly where we want to be, not too high, not too low,” said Randy Smith, spokesman for the South Florida Water Management District.

That can change quickly however, because there is still one season that is not over yet.

“Just because we get into dry season it doesn’t mean were out of hurricane season here in South Florida. Wilma in 2005 is a classic example. We had dry season type weather then we had Wilma,” said Setzer.

For the water management district, that would mean the dry season water conservation policies go on hold.

“We would have to draw the water levels down to a level where we can accommodate the water runoff,” said Smith.

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Dry season begins Friday October 15 and will last until May 15 of next year. Hurricane season ends November 30.

Dave Warren