By Jacqueline Quynh

MIAMI (CBS4) – King Tides are back and they are already causing parts of the Miami metro beaches to go underwater.

The phenomenon happens every year from September through November, but leaders across different municipalities have been working to find new solutions for neighborhoods and property to keep from flooding.

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In Miami-Dade County, the Haulover Marina was quick to take on water from the tides Thursday morning.

“It’s very common to see us around here in rainboots,” Michelle De Leon said.

De Leon lives in Miami Beach, she and residents around her were getting ready to move their cars out of underground garages that are prone to flooding.

“It is rising, it is getting worse, the sea walls are becoming more and more corroded, so we just wonder when it’s going to fall off,” she added.

Beach cities up and down the coast have worked to make upgrades and improve pump stations.

“You know in Miami they talked about building a whole wall in front of the city in Miami Beach,” Fort Lauderdale Mayor Dean Trantalis said.

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Trantalis has been overseeing improvements all over Fort Lauderdale to push away the water.

“We learn from not only our own experiences from other cities and other states, and countries,” Trantalis explained.

Adjusting as things go is part of the plan, Fort Lauderdale just completed a section of raised seawall near Cordova Road from 7th to 12th Streets earlier 2021. Overall, almost a mile has been completed.

“We raised the sea wall we were able to anticipate the impact of what would occur there,” Trantalis said.

The city has also installed 180 tidal valves to keep seawater out and drainage still flowing out. This month’s King Tide event is a good test run.

“We hope to have a nice clean dry street,” Trantalis added.

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King Tides are expected to be higher Friday.

Jacqueline Quynh