By Frances Wang

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – He’s made a career out of preserving Grammy Awards history.

In the halls of the closed GRAMMY Museum in downtown Los Angeles, you’ll find Michael Jackson’s iconic outfits, albums recorded by the legendary Nat King Cole, and past Grammy Award show performances playing on a loop.

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It’s music’s biggest night and it’s being etched in history at the grammy.

“At the end of the day we’re all about education and preserving music,” said museum President Michael Sticka. “To be able to pay tribute to music is deeply personal.”

Sticka’s job relies mostly on technology and art.

“Marrying technology and art in music I think is very natural, it’s very symbiotic if you think about it and how it’s come a long way from a technological standpoint over the years,” he said.

Because of the pandemic, these exhibits have been closed to the public for a year now, but Sticka and his team figured out a way for people to learn about music virtually

“You know, it’s certainly a learning curve, especially running a museum in the middle of a pandemic, I guess no one was prepped for that,” he said.

So Stika and his team launched a “Museum at Home Experience.” The museum doors may be closed, but their mission is open

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“All of our education programs, all of our exhibits, past exhibits, and all of our public programs have all gone online,” he said.

And their virtual initiative has been a success. Sticka says their programs have been streamed more than a million times since they launched it last year.

“Normally that’s not the case for us, normally we hit around 100 thousand,” he said.

So, if you’re interested in pursuing a music career or creating museum exhibits, Sticka has some advice – find a mentor.

“Find somebody who will spend time with you, talk about their experiences, listen to your goals and your thoughts and where you want to go and I think that’s the best first step,” he said.

Because that first step is very important.

“While we’ve been incredibly successful virtually, it’s not going to stop once we reopen our doors, we are going to continue, it will part be a part of our mission for music and education.”

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There is no timeline for when the GRAMMY Museum will open in person, but the team is working on a special exhibit to celebrate Motown once it does.

Frances Wang