CAPE CANAVERAL (CBSMiami) — It’s been 34 years since the Space Shuttle Challenger disaster.

Just 73 seconds into its flight on Jan. 28, 1986, the Challenger exploded, killing all seven on board.

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The Challenger disintegrated over the Atlantic Ocean, off the coast of central Florida, after a booster engine failed.

People all over the country watched the disaster live because the shuttle was carrying Christa McAuliffe, who would have been the first teacher in space.

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(FILE PHOTO) Space Shuttle Challenger crew members gather for an official portrait November 11, 1985 in an unspecified location. (Back, L-R) Mission Specialist Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher-in-Space participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist Greg Jarvis and mission specialist Judy Resnick. (Front, L-R) Pilot Mike Smith, commander Dick Scobee and mission specialist Ron McNair. The Challenger and its seven member crew were lost seventy three seconds after launch when a booster rocket failed. (Photo by NASA/Getty Images)

(FILE PHOTO) Space Shuttle Challenger crew members gather for an official portrait November 11, 1985. (Back, L-R) Mission Specialist Ellison S. Onizuka, Teacher-in-Space participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, Payload Specialist Greg Jarvis and mission specialist Judy Resnick. (Front, L-R) Pilot Mike Smith, commander Dick Scobee and mission specialist Ron McNair.  (Photo by NASA/Getty Images)

In addition to McAuliffe, crew members included Commander Dick Scobee, Gregory Jarvis, Ronald McNair, Ellison Onizuka, Judith Resnik, and co-pilot Michael J. Smith.

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NASA’s first Teacher in Space Project was designed to inspire students, honor teachers and spur interest in mathematics, science and space exploration.