By Carey Codd


HOLLYWOOD (CBSMiami) – Cellphone video captured the dramatic late night rescue of four people from a boat that slammed into a jetty near Port Everglades just after midnight Tuesday.

Part of the video shows a woman being lowered off the boat to safety.

There were some tense moments for first responders navigating through dark, choppy waters.

“It was important that we were able to give medical attention immediately,” said Broward Sheriff Fire Rescue Battalion Chief Kyle Vanbuskirk.

Vanbuskirk said once they got call, rescue teams responded quickly in two boats, including Fire Boat 6. When they arrived they found a woman had been ejected from the boat after the crash.

“She landed on the rocks,” Vanbuskirk said. “She landed about a foot and a half outside the water on the rocks, semi-conscious.”

WATCH: BOAT RAN INTO JETTY

 

Lt. Andres Hernandez captained Fire Boat 6. He faced a challenge — how to navigate toward the rocks and through the waves to get paramedics from his boat to the woman in order to begin medical treatment.

“I saw a gap to where I could get my guys — they were on the bow — and I nosed up to where I wouldn’t contact the rocks but give them enough room to get them onto it just to get them some help because there was no one there at the moment,” Hernandez said. “It’s a calculated risk. That’s what we do.”

And it worked. Hernandez said it appeared the woman had a head injury. Paramedics treated her until ground crews arrived to transport her as a trauma patient to a nearby hospital.

Four people were rescued after a boat slammed into a Port Everglades inlet jetty. (CBS4)

In all, investigators say two men and two women were taken to hospitals and all are expected to survive. First responders say the people on board the boat were lucky.

“They were very fortunate,” Vanbuskirk said. “Usually in these types of incidents, we’ve found in the past, specifically at a high rate of speed or any type of sudden stop into a jetty on the water, it adds a lot of complexity to the issue and there’s usually a possibility of a loss of life.”

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission is investigating the accident. At this point, they said it’s too early to determine a cause.

Investigators have not yet released any information on the owner of the boat or the identities of the people on board the 42-foot boat, which looks new with expensive and powerful engines and radar equipment.

Carey Codd

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