By Lisa Petrillo

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WYNWOOD (CBSMiami) — Welcome to Art Wynwood, the premiere art fair of the winter season.

Under a big, white tent, art enthusiasts and serious collectors can buy or browse through some of the most eye-opening pieces showcased by more than 65 international galleries.

Shepard Fairey attends Art Wynwood VIP Preview on February 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Aaron Davidson/Getty Images for Art Miami)

Shepard Fairey attends Art Wynwood VIP Preview on February 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Aaron Davidson/Getty Images for Art Miami)

“Art Wynwood is really the second bite of the apple where people can come out and see the best contemporary art anywhere. For many, it will be the first time around visiting us during this very busy weekend,” said Nick Korniloff, Founder of Art Miami.

The famous American contemporary street artist and activist, Shepard Fairey, was on site speaking to fans Friday. He’ll be given the Art Wynwood Tony Goldman Lifetime Artistic Achievement Award this year.

Most recently, Fairey released the world-famous “We the People” series to protest President Donald Trump, featuring portraits of Native Americans, African-Americans, Muslims and Latinas depicted with slogans such as “Defend Dignity” and “Protect Each Other.”

“The idea behind ‘We the People’ was to say we are all the same no matter the economic background, cultural background, wherever we come from. That should be the nature of America,” said Fairey.

Guests attends Art Wynwood VIP Preview on February 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Aaron Davidson/Getty Images for Art Miami)

Guests attends Art Wynwood VIP Preview on February 16, 2017 in Miami, Florida. (Photo by Aaron Davidson/Getty Images for Art Miami)

For the first time in the United States, tennis star Martina Navratilova & contemporary artist Juro Kralik present Art Grand Slam benefitting The Perry J. Cohen Foundation. The artist and athlete turn the sport of tennis into art through abstract paintings.

From sculpture to photographs, paintings and more, there is something to behold in every nook and cranny. Several large, true-to-life chimps hanging from trees by a Japanese artist were made from rolled strips of a wet newspaper.

Artist Trey Speegel uses paint by number kits as his source material to create a visual vocabulary. On a huge canvas mounted on the wall, he’s inviting fair-goers to paint by number to fill the words “What Kind of World Do You Want?” It will be sold when the fair is over for $50,000.

“It’s still my painting,” Speegle said, “But they are invited to come and paint and we tell them exactly what to do and how to do it.”

Lisa Petrillo

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