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WASHINGTON (CBSMiami/AP) — Lifesaving EpiPens have skyrocketed in price. Now members of Congress are demanding answers.

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EpiPens are injection devices used to ward off potentially fatal allergic reactions, and the price has surged in recent years. A two-dose package cost around $94 nine years ago. The average cost was more than six times that in May, according to the Elsevier Clinical Solutions’ Gold Standard Drug Database.

Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa, wrote Mylan, the company that manufactures the devices, and asked for more information on why the prices have increased. He cited the cost to parents whose children need them and also to schools that keep the EpiPens on hand. He noted the costs can also be passed on to taxpayers when children are covered by Medicaid or other government programs.

Two other senators, Democrats Mark Warner of Virginia and Richard Blumenthal of Connecticut, also wrote the company about the high prices. Warner said in a letter Tuesday that the issue is personal for him.

“As the parent of a child with severe allergies, I am all too familiar with the life-or-death importance of these devices,” Warner wrote.

Rep. Grace Meng, D-N.Y., on Tuesday asked the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee to hold a hearing on the issue. She is a co-chair of the Congressional Kids Safety Caucus.

“Thousands of Americans rely on EpiPens in a given year, and perhaps no time is more important in the purchasing of these devices than the beginning of a new school year,” Meng wrote in a letter to committee chairman Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, and top Democrat Elijah Cummings of Maryland.

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A two-dose package sold for an average $608 in May, according to the Elsevier database, and has possibly risen since then.

In a statement issued Monday, Mylan said it has savings programs for patients and is also offering free EpiPens to schools. The company said around half of U.S. schools are participating in that program.

Recent changes in health insurance have resulted in higher deductible costs for many families, the company said. “This current and ongoing shift has presented new challenges for consumers, and now they are bearing more of the cost” of the devices, the statement said.

Former head of Turing Pharmaceuticals Martin Shkreli is currently under indictment for securities fraud. He was heavily criticized for his “5,000 percent” price hike of the malaria and HIV medicine, Daraprim. He defended Mylan to CBS News on Tuesday.

“Mylan is the good guy. They had one product, and they finally started making a little bit of money and everyone is going crazy over it,” said Shkreli. “Like I said, it’s $300 a pack. $300. My iPhone is $700… It’s $300 and 90 percent of Americans are insured.”

Mylan said in a statement that they “are committed to working with customers and payers to find solutions to meet the needs of the patients and families we serve.”

Tuesday, Mylan’s stock fell 5 percent.

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