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HIALEAH (CBSMiami) – Normally when you hear a window shatter at your home you think a burglar is breaking in or a kid’s baseball smashed through it, maybe even a hurricane is sweeping by. But what about a high-tech drone?

Not even Andres Buksh imagined that one on Thursday night.

“I thought it was the neighbors throwing the big garbage out for Friday pick up,” said Buksh.

Instead when he checked Friday morning, he found unmanned drone had crash into his Hialeah home and it had broken his bedroom window.

“I guess somebody lost control of it,” said Buksh.

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He couldn’t believe no one had come to claim the flying machine, so he called police.

“They said this was the first call they had like this, so I told them ‘this is not going to be the last one anyway,’” he said.

And Buksh prediction could be spot on.

According to the Federal Aviation Administration, there has been a dramatic increase in the number of incidents involving drones just within the last year, as more people buy and fly them for sport.

Buksh says with more drones flying in the sky there is a greater chance of someone getting hurt.

“The windows you can replace, but if somebody walking in the street and it falls on their head or something, it could cause some serious injury,” said Buksh.

While the windows can be replaced, Buksh doesn’t want to get stuck with the bill to fix his. He has decided to do a little detective work of his own.

Buksh said he opened up the drone and found a video card inside with images of a man flying the drone above his home but he can’t see his face.

Buksh said the only way he will find the person responsible for breaking his window is if they come to claim it.

There are new FAA regulations that state anyone flying these machines for hobby must fly them no higher than 400 feet and the drone must stay in the line of site.

Evidently this owner was not aware of the rules or ignored them.

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