Newborn Lion Cubs Pride Of Zoo Miami

Zoo Miami is roaring with pride over the birth of three lion cubs, the zoo’s first in its 33-year history. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
1 Zoo Miami is roaring with pride over the birth of three lion cubs, the zoo’s first in its 33-year history. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
The cubs were born September 24th to Kashifa a 3-year, 8-month old lioness in a special den off exhibit. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
2 The cubs were born September 24th to Kashifa a 3-year, 8-month old lioness in a special den off exhibit. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Since their birth, the cubs were being observed in that den via a closed circuit camera which showed the newborns are being well cared for by the first time mother. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
3 Since their birth, the cubs were being observed in that den via a closed circuit camera which showed the newborns are being well cared for by the first time mother. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Tuesday morning, zoo staff was successful in shifting the mother, which allowed the cubs to be temporarily separated from their mother for their first neonatal examination. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
4 Tuesday morning, zoo staff was successful in shifting the mother, which allowed the cubs to be temporarily separated from their mother for their first neonatal examination. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
The examination allowed staff to determine the sex of the cubs as well as weights and overall conditions.  In addition, they received microchips for identification.  (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
5 The examination allowed staff to determine the sex of the cubs as well as weights and overall conditions. In addition, they received microchips for identification. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
The two males and single female appeared to be in excellent health weighing between 1.63kg and 1.75kg and will remain off exhibit with their mother for approximately 3 months until zoo staff feels confident that the cubs can be introduced to the rest of the pride and safely navigate the exhibit with the adults. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
6 The two males and single female appeared to be in excellent health weighing between 1.63kg and 1.75kg and will remain off exhibit with their mother for approximately 3 months until zoo staff feels confident that the cubs can be introduced to the rest of the pride and safely navigate the exhibit with the adults. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Kashifa is one of four lions that form the pride at Zoo Miami.  She shares the exhibit with her sister, Asha, and two unrelated brothers, Jabari and Kwame. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
7 Kashifa is one of four lions that form the pride at Zoo Miami. She shares the exhibit with her sister, Asha, and two unrelated brothers, Jabari and Kwame. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
It is not known for sure which of the two brothers is the father of the cubs. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
8 It is not known for sure which of the two brothers is the father of the cubs. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
The lion cubs were born as part of a carefully planned breeding that was the result of a Species Survival Plan (SSP) recommendation.  (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
9 The lion cubs were born as part of a carefully planned breeding that was the result of a Species Survival Plan (SSP) recommendation. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Species Survival Plans are part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) mission to cooperatively manage specific, and typically threatened or endangered species populations in accredited institutions. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
10 Species Survival Plans are part of the Association of Zoos and Aquariums (AZA) mission to cooperatively manage specific, and typically threatened or endangered species populations in accredited institutions. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Smile! (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
11 Smile! (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Lions are considered vulnerable and have suffered significant population declines over the last several decades with only an estimated 32,000 individuals remaining in the wild, down from over 100,000 living 50 years ago.  (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
12 Lions are considered vulnerable and have suffered significant population declines over the last several decades with only an estimated 32,000 individuals remaining in the wild, down from over 100,000 living 50 years ago. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
.  They are the only truly social cats living in prides that can number over 20 individuals.  (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
13 . They are the only truly social cats living in prides that can number over 20 individuals. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
Males can exceed 400 pounds and develop their classic mane between 4 and 7 years of age.  (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
14 Males can exceed 400 pounds and develop their classic mane between 4 and 7 years of age. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
In the wild, the average lifespan of lions is approximately 12-15 years but in captivity they can live over 20 years. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
15 In the wild, the average lifespan of lions is approximately 12-15 years but in captivity they can live over 20 years. (Source: Ron Magill/Zoo Miami)
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