S. Fla. Wild Python Encounters

(Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
python1
This giant Burmese Python captured and killed in the Everglades had recently consumed a female deer. (Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
(Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
The Burmese python was one of the largest ever found in South Florida. It was nearly 16 feet long and had eaten a 76 pound deer. (Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
python2
(Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
The Burmese python was one of the largest ever found in South Florida. It was nearly 16 feet long and had eaten a 76 pound deer. (Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
(Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
python3
This Burmese python was one of the largest ever found in South Florida. It was nearly 16 feet long and had eaten a 76 pound deer. (Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
(Courtesy: Robert Hill, South Florida Water Management)
(Source: National Park Service)
Python and alligator
The giant reptiles compete with alligators and crocodiles in the Everglades.(Source: National Park Service)
(Source: National Park Service)
(Source: National Park Service)
python and alligator
In 2005, a python apparently busted its gut after it had consumed a 6-foot alligator. (Source: National Park Service)
(Source: National Park Service)
(Source: National Park Service)
Python_NPS_20080512124307
Scientists and park managers are studying the exotic reptiles' breeding habits and pinpointing their locations to devise a strategy for controlling them. (Source: National Park Service)
(Source: National Park Service)
Large Burmese Pythons are regularly encountered in the Everglades. (Source: National Park Service)
Python_NPS_20080512122259
Large Burmese Pythons are regularly encountered in the Everglades. (Source: National Park Service)
Large Burmese Pythons are regularly encountered in the Everglades. (Source: National Park Service)
(Source: FWC)
Python_FWC
Commissioner Ron Bergeron, Shawn Heflick and FWC Chairman Rodney Barreto hold a Burmese python caught on state-managed lands in the Everglades on the first day of the FWC's Burmese python permit program. (Source: FWC)
(Source: FWC)
(Courtesy: Okeechobee Veterinary Hospital)
python_animalHospital
Staff from an animal hospital hold the python that was caught on the facility's property. (Courtesy: Okeechobee Veterinary Hospital)
(Courtesy: Okeechobee Veterinary Hospital)
(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Fish And Wildlife Officials Conduct Invasive Species Python Survey In Florida Everglades
A non-native Python snake is shown to the media as an example of snakes that are invading the Florida Everglades on March 1, 2011 in Miami, Florida. The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) and its partners in the Everglades Cooperative Invasive Species Management Area (ECISMA) are conducting a survey of Northern African pythons (also called African rock pythons) in western Miami-Dade County. The teams of snake hunters were checking the levees, canals and marsh on foot for the invasive species of reptile. Many of the non-native snakes have been introduced in to the wild when people release pet snakes after they grow to large to keep. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Although pythons have been found in or near some residential areas west of Miami, there have been no reports of injuries to people. (CBS4)
python
Although pythons have been found in or near some residential areas west of Miami, there have been no reports of injuries to people. (CBS4)
Although pythons have been found in or near some residential areas west of Miami, there have been no reports of injuries to people. (CBS4)
(Source: Lieutenant Scott Mullin/MDFR)
burmese_python_miami_dade
Firefighters hold a giant Burmese python believed to have grown wild in the Everglades. It was found beneath a trailer on a Redland farm. (Source: Lieutenant Scott Mullin/MDFR)
(Source: Lieutenant Scott Mullin/MDFR)
(Source: National Park Service)
Python_NPS_20090720102832
Burmese pythons established a breeding population in the Everglades several years ago, having arrived as escaped or deliberately released pets. The vast majority live south of Interstate 75, most clustering within a few miles of Tamiami Trail. (Source: National Park Service)
(Source: National Park Service)
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