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Contaminated Parks Cleanup May End Up In The Millions

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The City of Miami began digging up the dirty soil in the parking lot at Blanche Park on Monday September 9, 2013 at 3045 Shipping Ave. in Coconut Grove, putting in clean soil and laying down asphalt. Photo Courtesy: PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

The City of Miami began digging up the dirty soil in the parking lot at Blanche Park on Monday September 9, 2013 at 3045 Shipping Ave. in Coconut Grove, putting in clean soil and laying down asphalt. Photo Courtesy: PATRICK FARRELL / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

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MIAMI (CBSMiami) — A month after contaminated soil was found at a sixth Miami park, the bill for cleaning up the parks is looking to be in the millions.

The parks were closed after samplings  revealed the presence of some contamination.

According to CBS4 news partners the Miami Herald,  the process would take months to complete.

Miami City Commissioner Marc Sarnoff told the paper, “It’s a process that’s going to take longer than you or I or the residents would like,” said Sarnoff, whose district includes five of the parks. “I’m going to dedicate every life force I can to getting these open.”

Preliminary estimates have shown it may cost more than $3 million for the parks to be cleaned up, said Miami City Commissioner Marc Sarnoff to the paper.

Parks where there is contamination or  possible contamination include Blanche Park,  Merrie Christmas Park, Douglas Park, Billy Rolle Park, Curtis Park, and Southside Park.

At least three Miami parks, where contaminated soil was found, Blanche, Merrie Christmas and Douglas Park were once used to dump incinerator ash, Assistant City Manager Alice Bravo told the paper.

The ash from the bottom of incinerators usually contain heavy metals like lead, arsenic, antimony, and barium that can cause various health problems.

According to the paper, the tainted areas still have to be mapped out.  A Site Assessment Report will be drafted then the Miami-Dade County Department of Environmental Resources Management will have to approve the plans.

The county is using 2004 bond money to foot the bill for the remediation of the parks , according to the paper.

©2014 CBS Local Media, a division of CBS Radio Inc. All rights reserved. This material may not
be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. CBS4 news partner The Miami Herald  contributed material for this report.

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