Politics

Bills That Didn’t Pass The 2013 Legislature

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AP

AP

Legislative Session Coverage

TALLAHASSEE (CBSMiami/AP) – The regular session of the 2013 Florida Legislature came to a close on Friday.

While over 30 bills passed, like the bill to extend foster care from the age of 18 to 21, others didn’t make the cut.

Listed below are the measures that failed.

ABORTION

  •  Banned abortions that are based on the race or gender of a fetus.

BUSINESS & ECONOMY

  •  Helped the Miami Dolphins by kicking in money toward the $400 million needed for Sun Life Stadium renovations.
  • Set uniform state standards for workers to seek compensation from employers when they say they haven’t been paid their full wages.
  • Allowed Florida’s craft breweries to sell 64-ounce containers of beer for customers to take home.

COURTS

  •  Prohibited judges from applying foreign law — including Shariah, or Islamic law — in Florida cases.
  •  Eliminated mandatory life sentences for juveniles convicted of first-degree murder and allowed judges to consider factors like an offender’s age and maturity at the time of the crime, but required a 50-year minimum sentence.
  • Allowed grandparents to petition for visitation rights to their minor grandchildren.
  • Required a jury in a murder trial to recommend the death penalty unanimously instead of by a majority.

CRIME & PUNISHMENT

  • Criminalized “revenge porn,” the posting and identifying of nude photos, which is usually intended to humiliate an ex-lover.
  • Made it illegal to allow an “open party” if a minor possessed or was consuming alcohol, or taking drugs.
  • Allowed someone licensed to carry a concealed weapon to do so at a concert, sporting game, or other event.
  • Required an alleged attacker to commit an “overt act” before using self-defense under the state’s ‘Stand Your Ground’ law.

EDUCATION

  • Allowed Florida teachers and other school employees to carry firearms to fight back in the event of a schoolhouse attack.
  • Let parents at failing public schools help to “trigger” turnaround plans, including handing them over to private educational management companies, by allowing them to vote on an option.
  • Permitted U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants to pay in-state tuition at public colleges and universities.

GOVERNMENT

  • Closed the state pension plan to new state and county employees and teachers and made them sign up for retirement accounts similar to 401(k) plans.

HEALTH CARE

  • Taken $50 billion in federal money over the next decade to expand health care coverage for needy Floridians as allowed under the Affordable Care Act, in lieu of a Medicaid expansion.
  • Required doctors and pharmacists to check the state’s prescription drug tracking system, a database that monitors who is getting prescriptions in Florida.
  • Created a needle-exchange pilot program in Miami-Dade County.

INSURANCE

  • Eliminated the state’s no-fault Personal Injury Protection auto insurance.

MOTOR VEHICLES

  • Rolled back sharp increases in auto fees that the state adopted three years ago to close a large budget gap and paid for them by eliminating a payroll tax credit to insurance companies.

BILL THAT WAS PASSED BUT LATER VETOED

Another bill passed the Legislature but was vetoed by Gov. Rick Scott that would have ended permanent alimony in Florida, limited how much alimony an ex-spouse could receive and required judges to give divorced parents equal custody of their children absent extraordinary circumstances.

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