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Report: Fellow Owners Upset With Loria

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Jeffrey Loria

(Photo by Mike Ehrmann/Getty Images)

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Miami Marlins

CHICAGO, Ill. (CBSMiami) – Miami Marlins owner Jeffrey Loria’s fire sale not only angered fans, but also fellow owners who now have a much harder road to hike if they ever want to secure public funding for a new stadium.

According to the New York Post, Loria is at the owners meetings in Chicago and sat alone in the lunch room Wednesday without talking to a single fellow owner.

“Teams from the American League East were unhappy the Blue Jays improved dramatically, clubs from the NL Central and West were displeased that the four other NL East members would be able to feast on the carcass posing as the Marlins and there was a general sense of embarrassment,” the Post reported.

But just because they’re upset, don’t expect the fellow owners to put up much of a fight against the Marlins’ trade to the Blue Jays. According to the Post, the Yankees’ representative at the meetings didn’t challenge the deal and said the Marlins were following the rules.

Still, Loria’s self-serving action to line his pockets while the team crumbles into the cellar of baseball will cause major problems for his fellow owners.

Loria and the Marlins promised to be competitive and promised a new day in Miami baseball in order to get Marlins Park built, largely with public money. Now that it’s built, Loria has dumped the big money players and is more than ready to see his team fail again based on his latest move.

That will make any other city thinking about doing a deal with a team for a stadium think long and hard and protect itself much better than Miami’s attorney’s failed to do; thus making a stadium deal with public funding much more difficult to attain.

Loria is declining interviews and his team president, David Samson, has said repeatedly the moves were about being competitive and that something had to change after finishing in last place.

The problem for Loria, Samson, and the rest of the Marlins organization is the public in Miami has zero trust in the team to ever make things better. Three times in the franchise’s history, the team has been blown up and was left devoid of talent.

While fellow owners may be ready to watch their team demolish what’s left of the Marlins, the problems in the long-run could outweigh any short-term success.

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