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South Floridians Turn To Sound Therapy For Healing

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Sound therapy offering an alternative to traditional medicine. (CBS4)

Sound therapy offering an alternative to traditional medicine. (CBS4)

Healthy Living

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – The number of people trying alternative medicine has exploded in the past 10 years.

Now, about 35 percent of Americans try alternative medicine before traditional medicine.

People in South Florida are trying something called Sound Therapy. Believers said it brings out your positive energy.

How does it work?  It works with the help of a didgeridoo, an ancient aboriginal Australian instrument, one of the oldest wind instruments in the world.

Harmonic healer, Joda Cook uses it to practice sound therapy also known as vibration healing.

“I put positive in and get the negative energy out of the body,” said Cook.

He can sense where the tension is.

“Sometimes I get to a certain part of the body and it feels like there’s a hand there holding it. Let’s me know that body needs more attention,” said Cook.

Sue Monuse suffers from depression and anxiety. She believes can feel the didgeridoo working on her different chakras and energy points.

“Relaxing and tingling. It balances my whole energy,” Monuse said.

In the past five years Sue has replaced a slew of pills with alternative healing and said she no longer suffers side affects.

The ancient device is made of bamboo and at the top where the healer blows in air, it is covered by beeswax.

Monuse said she doesn’t just get balance from the didgeridoo but also from crystals through medical chin gong.

Mao Ardissone who owns the Ayama Yoga Healing and Arts Center in North Miami said, “Everything in nature vibrates and has a sound and the color adds a form of vibration.”

Ardissonne has been practicing Chinese medicine for a decade and said each crystal vibrates differently and should be paced near areas that need to be rebalanced.

Also, he said Thai massage helps realign the body. It’s a kind massage, meets yoga meets chiropractor.

Ardissone actually realigns a patient using his hands and feet and twisting the client on the floor. Charlie Himmelstern is a client who has severe scoliosis.

“What changes is the tension between the bones and the muscles,” Himmeslstern said.

Clients opting for alternative treatments to realign, readjust and refocus are trying alternative steps before traditional.

“I’ve had people tell me I know you’re blowing out but it feels like you’re pulling things out of me,” said didgeridoo expert, Cook says

This serves as testament that something is changing for the better.

The procedures will run you about $80 an hour.

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