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Start Of Rainy Season Brings Mosquito Invasion

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Summer Guide

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – An early start to the summer’s rainy season has brought an invasion of unwanted visitors – mosquitoes.

Mosquito control agencies in both Miami-Dade and Broward are using trucks and planes to spray for the pesky critters which could pose potential health problems.

“Mosquito populations are likely to increase after recent rains,” said State Public Health Veterinarian Dr. Carina Blackmore. “It’s important that Floridians and visitors are informed that the risk of mosquito-borne disease is minimized by implementing precautions.”

First, look around your patio areas and yards and get rid of any cans, old tires, buckets, unused plastic swimming pools or other containers that can collect and hold standing water, which promotes breeding. Next, check to make sure you don’t have any leaky pipes outdoors.

Empty any water that collects in boats and clean out clogged gutters. You should scrub and change water in vases holding flowers or cuttings twice each week or grow cuttings in sand.

Fill holes in trees with sand or mortar, or drain or spray them as required. If you have a pond or fish pool, stock it with minnows which will eat the mosquito larvae.

Keep doors and windows closed, stay indoors at dusk and dawn, dress in long-sleeved and light-colored clothing and apply insect repellent containing DEET o clothing and skin.

Broward County Mosquito Control sprays areas of the county by truck and plane based on the number of calls they get. To request mosquito spraying service, visit broward.org and click MOSQUITO SERVICES under Online Services, or call 954-765-4062.

Miami-Dade residents who have questions about the aerial spraying, or complaints about mosquitoes, can call the County’s Answer Center at 3-1-1.

Symptoms of mosquito-borne illnesses may include headache, fever, fatigue, dizziness, weakness and confusion. It can take two to 14 days to become sick after being bitten by an infected mosquito.

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