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The Skinny On Food’s ‘Biggest Losers’

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CBS Miami (con't)

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MIAMI (CBS4) – Your stomach may turn after you hear the gut-wrenching truth about some of the most mouth watering meals.

The Center for Science in the Public Interest just released a list of the ‘biggest losers’—foods that are super sized in calories and fat.

Topping the list is Coldstone Creamery’s PB&C shake with a whopping 2010 calories and 68 grams of saturated fat. Tasty as it might be, the shake packs more calories than you should have in a whole day and enough saturated fat to last you three and a half days!

While indulgent and unhealthy foods like this have always been around, it seems like nowadays there are more disastrous dishes than ever.

“These extreme dishes are more prevalent. It’s not that the worst are worse than they used to be, it’s that there are more at this extreme level,” explained Bonnie Liebman, the Director of Nutrition at the Center of Science in the Public Interest.

Consider Denny’s Deep Fried Cheese Melt, a 1,260 calorie invention that consists of fried mozzarella sticks wedged inside of a grilled cheese sandwich. Or how about Cheesecake Factory’s Farmhouse Burger, a cheeseburger topped with pork belly, mayonnaise and fried egg? This little treasure contains 1,530 calories and would be equivalent to gobbling down four McDonald’s ¼ Pounders with cheese.

As if these hefty dishes weren’t already enough, a study published on Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that many fast-food and sit-down chains underestimate the caloric content of their foods.

After looking at 42 popular American chains like Burger King, Olive Garden, Outback Steakhouse, and McDonald’s the team concluded that on average, fast-food restaurants underestimate their food items by 134 calories, while sit-down restaurants do so by  about 225.

With so many mouth-watering temptations and mis-marked menu items, it can be tough making healthy choices. While no studies have definitively proven that displaying calories affects decision making, health experts hope that this soon-to-be required information will lead to better choices.

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