Bicycling League Invites Commuters To Bike To Work

MIAMI (CBS4)- May is National Bike Month and for riders who haven’t used their bikes in a while this might be a good time to dust it off and take it for a spin.

Olga Cano and Dario Gonzalez, a couple from Miami who ride their bikes every day, met about two years ago while organizing a bike event and ever since then they have been riding together.

“Bicycling is definitely a part of our life,” said Gonzalez.

But for those who don’t bike ride daily, there’s time to show your support and promote healthy living by biking this week.

The League of American Bicyclists is the national sponsor of Bike Month, and this year they are encouraging all who can to ride to work the week of May 16 to 20 to do so. Bike to work day is on Friday.


Every day, before leaving their Biscayne Bay condo, Olga and Dario grab their cell phones, bags, helmets and bicycles then ride off to work.

“A lot of us, for instance me, spend most of my time in an office really inactive and this is a good way for me to get some activity,” Gonzalez said.

They ride their bikes to work, to certain errands and sometimes even to the doctor, the couple said.

“I think it’s great” said Cano.

The bike enthusiast rides from Biscayne to the government center with her boyfriend then hops on the train to Coral Gables.

“It’s practical,” Cano said. “I get my work out and it is pretty stress relieving actually.”

It is also a great way to burn off calories.

“It is something we can all partake in, Gonzalez said. “In the U.S. we suffer from obesity and this is a good solution and practical.”

If you are planning on riding bike this month but need to freshen up on your bike safety and riding skills the League has several bide education resources to help you ride confidently and safely.

For more information visit www.bikeleague.org

Comments

One Comment

  1. Indhy says:

    LMAO!!! Yeah right!! I have no problem with exercising, I have a problem with getting to work drenched in sweat, stinky, and no shower to take one… And with the horrible drivers in Miami, I might as well consider it a death sentence! Not a good a idea for a daily commute in Miami, especially in the middle of the summer… Thanks, but NO THANKS!

    1. Daus says:

      They technically are required by law. The law specifically states no more than two cyclists abreast on the roads, just the cyclists were doing on the video.

      Licensing and number plate schemes would be prohibitively costly and would not improve road safety.

      Requiring people to complete training, register a number plate or take out insurance would create unnecessary obstacles to getting on a bike. This would greatly discourage cycling. Moreover, they are likely to create huge administrative burdens and costs, which will not be offset by the
      funds raised.

      1. Daus says:

        @lndhy, sorry, that comment was meant for Mari below.

  2. agd says:

    i would bike and i really would loveee to do so, but i work in hialeah, so forget it. im asking for my death wish

    1. Daus says:

      Support your local lawmakers for “Complete Streets” programs where new and existing constructions projects are designed to accomodate pedestrians, bikers and cars. The cost to add to these proejcts is very minimal (usually paint and stripes).

      When commuting Hialeah, bike as a car would and choose roads with bike lanes, side streets and always follow with traffic.

  3. Brandt Absolu says:

    Riding to work is not something you just start doing. You have to do it in steps.

    First you have to start riding around your neighborhood and around town, but not too far from home. Figure out the streets that you feel safe on (especially the ones with bike lanes), the streets to avoid, and the shortcuts. Find out if there are any bike paths too. Start doing your errands on your bike – that will help you rediscover your neighborhood.

    Next, you can pick a few days out of the week to start riding to work, even if it’s just one. It’s suggested to go through the route before you actually ride to work, so you know what you’re in for. Also, make the route so that you stay off the busiest streets.

    Once you start feeling comfortable, you can start riding to work everyday.

    A few things to keep in mind:
    -Most of the “sweat” that you imagine drenching your clothes can be avoided. It’s all about choosing the right bike, the right bike size, and how fast you’re going. Mountain bikes are not a good choice for riding to work. Commuters, which look like mountain bikes, are ideal, because they have the skinnier tires which make the ride easier. A road bike is also a good option. And when it’s hot, slow down. The wind that you feel while riding can help cool your body. Also, it’s best to wear as little clothing as possible (like t-shirt/tanktop and shorts) to keep you cool, and bring the clothes that you need to be wearing with you.

    -While many people use backpacks to carry all their stuff, the downside to that is that it makes your back sweaty. The best way to prevent a sweaty back is to purchase a “pannier” (go to banjobrothers.com for some examples). A rear rack is required for this pannier – it attaches to your rack, and it’s basically what a trunk is for a car – you can put anything you want it, and it repels water, so your stuff won’t get wet easily in the rain. You can store your lock, your change of clothes, and anything else you might need in it, which means you can carry all your stuff without drenching your back.

    -Check on your tire pressure at least once a week, and keep it at the upper end of the printed limit. When the pressure is low, you have to pedal harder, which will make you sweat.

    -Don’t ride on the sidewalk. It’s not as safe as you think, because turning drivers don’t see you coming. But DO ride on the sidewalk if the street in question is three lanes (in one direction) or more, unless there’s a bike lane. Even if there’s a bike lane, get on the sidewalk if you don’t feel safe.

  4. Mari says:

    How come the hordes of bicycle riders don’t need to follow the law and stop at stop lights? I am not talking about people biking to work, I am talking about 50-100 bike riders taking two lanes of traffic and I behind them going 10 miles an hour. If they can ride on the two lanes of the road, how come they don’t have to pay for tags for their bikes??????????? Miami politicians….great source of revenue!!!!!

    1. Daus says:

      They technically are required by law. The law specifically states no more than two cyclists abreast on the roads, just the cyclists were doing on the video.

      Licensing and number plate schemes would be prohibitively costly and would not improve road safety.

      Requiring people to complete training, register a number plate or take out insurance would create unnecessary obstacles to getting on a bike. This would greatly discourage cycling. Moreover, they are likely to create huge administrative burdens and costs, which will not be offset by the
      funds raised

      1. Ivan Frank says:

        I agree with Daus, if we were to pay a scaled-down registration for bikes – considering a car’s size and weight – we would be talking about less than $5 a bike. And how would you handle situation when a rider changes his handlebars, frames, etc? It just doesn’t make any sense.

        If you want more state revenue then lets bring back the pollution car inspections every year or two😛

  5. Lmxdi909 says:

    I agree, Mari, it’s about time that cyclists learn to respect the law just like motorists do. Motorists obey the speed limit and never block crosswalks or roll through stop signs. And it’s due time for all road users to pay their fair share. I suggest that a tax or registration fee should be proportional to either vehicle size, weight, overall lethality, or harmful emissions produced. And pedestrians should no longer be exempt from this either.

    1. doc says:

      Do motorists respect the speed limit? Do motorists indicate?

      Not in Miami.

      1. Ivan Frank says:

        You see what he did there? With the Sarcasm? Yeah..

    2. pfonke says:

      You go! I eagerly await my enormous rebate! I pay full taxes (and local taxes fund our city streets), yet all I get is a sliver of road where motorists routinely try to ride me off — and the wear I inflict on the roads is negligible. And, really, I expect better than a call for cyclists to respect the law, “just like motorists do.” There are cyclists who ignore the law. They are wrong. But if they took SoFla motorists as their example, things would be a whole lot worse. Without exaggeration, 9 out of 10 Miami motorists do not signal turns. All Miami drivers exceed the speed limit (hey, cyclists would do it if they could!). At least 50% of drivers treat stop signs as commas and do rolling right turns at stop lights. As a pedestrian, I find that — at busy intersections — cars often block crosswalks. Bikes shouldn’t, but at least it’s easier for them to back away or be walked around.

      As for pedestrians, don’t let those cheapskates get away with crossing our roads for free! Coin-operated crosswalks are the way to go!

  6. Terri says:

    Great article and Brandt, great advice! I am definitely going to try to use my bike more for shorter commutes around my neighborhood. I am very happy that Miami is becoming more bike-friendly and bike-aware. As long as cyclists are following the rules of the road we can all be safe.

  7. Cam says:

    I commute by bike to FIU too, it’s great. Sweat is an issue, though, especially in humid Miami. If you can’t shower when you get to work, you mainly want to look at the time you’re riding (earlier in the morning beats the heat) and not riding the whole way (do like Dario and Olga and take the bus most of the way).

    But if you *are* going to FIU, remember you have access to the Rec Center showers, which are nice and clean.

    @Lmxdi909: Sarcasm doesn’t come across as well as you think it does in text😀

  8. Travis Johnson says:

    I live in Homestead and bike most days to work about 4 miles each way. It’s about 25 minutes worth of good cardio daily. And, with a ride that distance, sweat isn’t that big of a deal…quick stop in the office restroom to wash my face and I’m good to go.

    It saves a bit of cash in gas. Time in not needed to hit the gym for cardio. And, it’s a good stress reliever.

  9. Alexander J. Labora says:

    I commute too. Bank, groceries, hardware store, kids to school and court. Use hand signals, look for streets with less cars and bike lanes. Always try to use yellow vest over my suite and tie. Remember as a cyclist you can be a pedestrian or vehicle at will.
    The pannier idea is great, I have one for clothes and another for groceries. My car computer shows an average speed of 22 mph not much faster than me on my bike at 17 to 18 on the commuter bike.

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