By CBSMiami.com Team

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Floridians are about to turn their clocks back one hour and get back that hour of sleep lost in March with the return of Standard Time. Remember Spring is when we “Spring Forward” and Fall is when we “Fall Back into Daylight Saving Time (often incorrectly called daylight savings time).

Standard Time returns at 2 a.m. on Sunday, November 7. That means if you’re staying in Saturday night, be sure to turn your clocks back one hour before you go to bed. If you’re out at 2 a.m., set your clocks back an hour when you wake up in the morning.

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Daylight Saving Time gives people that extra hour of sunlight during the warm summer months, then comes Standard Time when that extra hour of daylight is snatched away in the evening and shifted to the morning hours. It’s an age old tradition that officially isn’t that old.

The practice of Daylight Saving Time became official in 1975 as a way to save energy and take advantage of natural daylight.

Standard Time used to begin in the middle of October, but it was moved to the first weekend in November in 2007.

Daylight Saving Time will return the second Sunday in March.

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Arizona, Puerto Rico, Hawaii, the U.S. Virgin Islands, Northern Marians Islands, Guam, and American Samoa do not observe Daylight Saving Time.

Didn’t Florida do away with the whole clock-changing thing?

The answer is yes. The Sunshine Protection Act was passed by the Florida Senate and signed by then-Gov. Rick Scott in 2018 to keep Florida in Daylight Saving Time permanently.

However, federal law currently does not allow full-time Daylight Saving Time and a change would require congressional approval.

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As always, Daylight Saving Time is also a good time to remember to swap the batteries in your family’s smoke and carbon monoxide detectors for fresh ones.

CBSMiami.com Team