MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Monday night crowds are making it apparent that Miami’s Wynwood neighborhood is benefiting big time from the lifting of the countywide curfew.

A party bus full of people, with drinks in hand, pedaled down NW 2 Avenue. Hordes of people walked the streets – most of them were tourists. At first glance, it would appear that some things never changed.

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Wynwood was hopping on a Monday night – the first night the Miami-Dade curfew has been lifted.

As night fell, the graffiti streets came alive. For some who are from Miami, the original curfew meant little in the first place.

Joe Guzman said, “If you know where to go, it’s been lifted. Not to scare the people. We weren’t going out, but hordes of people were still doing what they got to do and want to do. But now that it has been lifted, the responsible guys are out and having a good time.”

Last Week, Miami-Dade Mayor Daniella Levine Cava announced as of Monday, April 12, the midnight curfew would no longer be in place. She cited the infection and hospital rates are trending downward in the county.

Wynwood shop owners and managers believe it was time.

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Pedro Roa, manager at the fashion and social impact store said, “I think it’s already time. People want to go out. If they wear masks and do what they’re supposed to do, we should be alright.”

Wynwood endured the initial shut down. Then a minimal opening. But now a nightlife once again to 3 a.m. For the business district, it’s monumental.

Manny Gonzalez from the Wynwood Business Investment District said those three hours nearly caved some businesses.

“For the food and beverage, this could 30-40% for some of these businesses,” said Gonzalez, “and that’s huge.”

Coyo Taco on NW 2 Avenue still sees a brisk business with almost all of the socially distance tables taken by patrons. A line snaked through the door to the outside eating area. But the owner, Allen Drummond, said those hours from midnight to 3 a.m. were a key component to his business.

Drummond added, “Those were the three hours we were known for. The late-night crowd is what we get for tacos and in the back.  So it’s been hard getting a DJ or something started if you have a hard stop at 12.”

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Mom always said “good happens after midnight,” but an entire business district, which caters to late-night crowds, would certainly beg to differ.

CBSMiami.com Team