By Joan Murray

SUNRISE (CBSMiami) – As the FBI continues to comb the scene where two agents were killed and three were injured while serving a search warrant, a neighbor of the accused gunman is sharing her interactions with him.

“He was grumpy. Kept to himself,” April Evans said of David Huber, who the FBI confirmed as the shooter. “He didn’t really speak to anyone. If you attempted to speak to him, he would turn his head and walk faster.”

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Evans described Huber as almost antisocial. She remembered a pest control man having a disturbing encounter with Huber.

“He was shaken. He says, ‘He pointed a gun in my face,’” Evans recalled.

The FBI has released little information on Huber, who took his own life and had no criminal history.

On Thursday, a car was towed from the Sunrise apartment parking lot as evidence. It’s unsure whether that car belongs to the Huber or somebody else.

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“I think shame is part of it. Suicide is often a part of it,” Glen Pounder said.

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Pounder is former law enforcement and now heads the nonprofit Child Rescue Coalition in South Florida.

They help police agencies worldwide catch child predators with a map that shows in real time the sharing of child sexual abuse material.

“This guy may have been committing hands on offenses for years,” Pounder said. “Some psychologists have found it goes on 20, 30 years without detection.”

He said parents can learn a lot from this tragedy.

“It’s a time for them to check what their kids are doing online. We have tips on our website,” Pounder said.

As part of the community work she did, Special Agent Laura Schwartzenberger, who died alongside Daniel Alfin, would speak to children and parents about the dangerous people that lurk on the web.

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“Schwartzenberger talking to children and making sure that they are aware of the dangers that exist online is so important – not just for those kids, but those families, those parents,” State Sen. Lauren Book said of Schwartzenberger’s community work. “It’s important to know that one in five children, regardless of their gender, will be solicited for sex online at some point. Particularly at this time during the pandemic, children are particularly vulnerable.”