By Hank Tester

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Across South Florida, numerous food distributions to those impacted by the pandemic are held on a weekly basis.

“There are between six and eight hundred cars here getting in line very early in the morning,” said Kevin Picard, with the City of Sunrise, at a recent distribution.

As the pandemic economic nightmare squeezes tighter and tighter, the boxes and bags of food handed out become even more critical.

“People are really suffering,” said Carol Barollarth as she waited in line at a food distribution event in Homestead.

It’s a bleak picture that grows darker by the day.

“We have over 300,000 people in Broward County who are food insecure right now,” said Broward Commissioner Dr. Barbara Sharief.

Food distribution has been running at full tilt, but the question is how long can they keep going at such a pace. Most federal government support, which they rely on, ends December 31st and Congress has stalled on any action that would keep it going.

“I think it could get really ugly,” said Stephen Shelly, CEO of Farm Share which operates numerous food distribution sites. “It is going to be a very difficult situation if we don’t get help from the state and federal government in terms of food or dollars.”

Feeding South Florida, which distributes 16 million pounds of food a month, has been outspoken about what needs to be done.

“We have been in touch with our federal elected officials. They understand it, so it is really on them to inform their colleagues in Washington of the dire circumstances and help our families,” said Sari Vatske, Executive Vice President of Feeding South Florida.

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“When you see the lines you understand the magnitude and gravity of the situation here in Broward,” said Sharief.

If you want to help, cash contributions to the distribution organizations work best. They urge everyone to contact their congressional representative to urge action.