MIAMI (CBSMiami) – On the first of every month, fellows from the renowned New World Symphony will add rhythm to Lincoln Road by performing from roaming golf carts, while observing social distancing.

The Musicians on Golf Carts Series was created by the Lincoln Road Business Improvement District.

“We will do it the first weekend of every month from now until April. It is three classically trained musicians from New World Symphony, Americas Orchestral Academy, in three different golf carts, going up and down Lincoln Road playing over three nights from 8 to 10 p.m. It’s just magnificent,” said Timothy Schmand, executive director at Lincoln Road BID.

The program, which kicked off earlier this month, has a mapped out plan that roves back and forth between the east and west ends of Lincoln Road.

“So they head off in different directions. Everything commences at the corner of Drexel and Lincoln at 8 o’clock, that’s when we kick off. It’s not quite military precision but there’s organization to it. One golf cart will go east towards the beach and will split up and go to the opposite sides of Lincoln Road. They travel around together and then at a certain point they all meet up and play together making sure they don’t draw too big of a crowd. Then they split up again and go about the road,” Schmand said.

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For the musicians, like New World Symphony’s third year trumpet fellow Aaron Ney, getting back to what they do just feels right.

“So it’s really nice to be out here with these people and share what we love to do and hopefully make their night more memorable,” said Ney.

Ney and the other musicians will be back at it the weekend of December 4-6. The rest of the schedule looks like this:

  • Jan 1-3, 2021
  • Feb 5-7, 2021
  • Mar 5-7, 2021
  • Apr 2-4, 2021

“The quality of their play is something we don’t get to hear often, especially to hear it live. So the quality of their play and their opportunity to get out and interact with the public and to try this new crazy idea is good for them and of course we pay them,” said Schmand.

Lisa Petrillo