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MIAMI (CBSMiami) — Florida voters are into Governor Ron DeSantis even though he has been on the job less than a month, according to a new Mason-Dixon Florida poll.

The new survey shows the Republican DeSantis with a 48-percent favorable ratings and 17-percent unfavorable. 31-percent are neutral and 4-percent have never heard of him.

DeSantis’ favorable rating is up 9-points since the last Mason-Dixon poll in October before his election and his unfavorable rating has been cut in half from 34-percent to 17-percent.

The new poll ratings also put DeSantis way ahead of Florida’s two Republican U.S. Senators, Marco Rubio and Rick Scott, and President Donald Trump.

The poll found Trump remains a divisive figure in Florida, a state he narrowly carried in 2016.

The poll found Trump’s job rating is slightly underwater at the moment. Statewide, 47-percent of voters approve of Trump’s job performance, while 50-percent disapprove and 3-percent are undecided.

Trump continues to divide voters along party lines, with 87-percent of Republicans approving and 92-percent of Democrats disapproving of his performance.

Likewise, a clear gender gap is apparent with Trump’s job performance approved of by 53-percent of men and disapproved of by 55-percent of women.

Florida voters are into Governor Ron DeSantis even though he has been on the job less than a month, according to a new Mason-Dixon Florida poll.

Voters split just as cleanly on whether or not they are inclined to vote to re-elect or replace Trump in the 2020 election. Statewide, 46-percent say they will vote to replace Trump with a Democrat, while 45-percent will vote to re-elect him. 9-percent are not sure how they will vote.

U.S. Sen. Rick Scott’s favorable rating in the poll is 42-percent, 38-percent view him as unfavorable and 20-percent are neutral.

U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio’s favorable rating is 44-percent and unfavorable by 23-percent with 32-percent neutral.

The poll of 625 registered Florida voters was taken through telephone interviews from Jan. 14 through Jan. 17 and had a margin of error of +/- 4 percent.

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