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CHICAGO (CBS) – This month’s shocking suicides of designer Kate Spade and celebrity chef Anthony Bourdain brought conversations of mental health and depression to the forefront.

Also, a new study from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention raises concerns about the rise of suicides across the country.

Dr. Sheela Raja, a clinical psychologist, said she would like to see a national conversation about suicide prevention and coping with loss.

“We’re losing 125 Americans a day to suicide. The rates have gone up by 20-25 percent in the last two decades,” said Raja. “Even more with our young people. We have an epidemic on our hands.”

The cause isn’t clear.

“We really aren’t sure. Social media is contributing to the fact that we’re all online too much and not connecting as much as we used to,” said Raja. “We really do have to look out for the risks. When somebody says ‘I’m thinking about hurting myself’ we can’t assume that they’re not going to take it seriously.”

If people see warning signs but an individual does not want assistance, there things people can still to help a person in crisis.

“One of the things we as a culture need to start doing is that we have to destigmatize talk about mental health, suicide, bullying, discrimination,” said Raja. “All of those things where people can talk openly so they can start getting help.”

To get help or more information contact the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.

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