Follow CBSMIAMI.COM: Facebook | Twitter
MIAMI (CBSMiami) – In a stunning blow to the European Union, voters in the United Kingdom decided, by a narrow margin, to leave.

That decision triggered the resignation of the country’s Prime Minister David Cameron.

“I do not think it would be right for me to try to be the captain that steers our country to its next destination,” said Cameron who supported staying in the EU.

The Prime Minister called for the ‘Brexit’ referendum, under pressure from members of his party including former London Mayor Boris Johnson who was firmly behind leaving the union.

Johnson, who expressed concerns over mass immigration into Britain, was booed and called names by angry voters as he left his London home Friday morning.

“We can pass our laws and set our taxes entirely according to the need of the UK economy. We can control our own borders in a way that is not discriminatory but fair and balanced,” said Johnson.

Britain’s decision to leave the EU is already being felt around the world.

Markets Tumbled On UK Vote To Exit EU

During a tour of his golf courses in Scotland, Donald Trump praised the outcome of the vote, calling it a sign that the UK “took back control of their country.”

//platform.twitter.com/widgets.js

“It’s a great thing,” Trump said at the reopening of his Turnberry, Scotland golf resort. “They’re angry over borders, they’re angry over people coming into the country and taking over.”

“I think there are great similarities between happened here and my campaign,” he added. “People want to take their country back.”

Trump said a drop in the British could be beneficial.

“When the pound goes down, more people are coming to Turnberry frankly, and the pound has gone down and let’s see what the impact of that has, “ said Trump. “But I think places like Scotland and England and different places in Great Britain, I think you’re going to see a lot of activity,” he added.

Trump said the benefits will show up for Americans travelling abroad.

Former First Lady Hillary Clinton, who will most likely be squaring off with Trump in November in the presidential campaign, had a more moderate response.

“We respect the choice the people of the United Kingdom have made. Our first task has to be to make sure that the economic uncertainty created by these events does not hurt working families here in America. We also have to make clear America’s steadfast commitment to the special relationship with Britain and the transatlantic alliance with Europe,” said Clinton in a statement.

Clinton presidential campaign rival Sen. Bernie Sanders also voiced his “concerns” about the vote.

“I think it’s a decision for the British people but I have concerns,” Sanders said in an interview with “CBS This Morning” Friday. “I have concerns you know when we think back over the last 100 years and the horrible wars, the kind of blood that was shed throughout Europe — the idea of the countries coming closer together is something that we want to see.”

House Speaker Paul Ryan said the U.S. relationships with the UK will remain unaffected by the vote.

“The UK is an indispensable ally of the United States, and that special relationship is unaffected by this vote,” said Ryan in a statement.

Clinton and Sanders didn’t comment on Cameron resigning as prime minister but Trump did.

He simply said, “Well, that’s too bad.”

Britain has been a part of the 28 nation bloc since joining 43 years ago. Formally separating won’t be easy, the process is expected to take at least two years.

Comments