MIAMI (CBSMiami/AP) — The Miami Marlins saw the promise in acquiring Henderson Alvarez and Jake Marisnick last year during the teams salary dump. Wednesday night, both players showed the Fish that they made the right decision.

Marisnick, 22, hit his first major league home run to help send the Marlins to a 3-2 victory over the New York Mets at Marlins Park.

“It felt good,” Marisnick said. “It was the first at-bat where I really slowed everything down.”

Alvarez (2-1) pitched into the eighth inning, allowing just two runs and six hits in 7 1-3 innings, and had two hits and scored a run, too.

“I felt I prepared well, and all of my pitches were working good tonight,” Alvarez said.

Alvarez is 2-0 with a 1.33 ERA in his last four starts.

Marisnick and Alvarez were acquired from Toronto, along with shortstop Adeiny Hechavarria, in November’s blockbuster trade that sent veterans Jose Reyes, Mark Buehrle, Josh Johnson, John Buck, and Emilio Bonifacio to the Blue Jays.

“I think you realize how good of players we got in that trade and how much those guys are going to be a big part of not only this team this year, but the future,” Marlins manager Mike Redmond said. “These guys can play.”

Giancarlo Stanton and Placido Polanco also drove in a run each for the Marlins, who dropped the first two games of the four-game series with the Mets.

Mike Dunn got four outs for his second save in place of Steve Cishek, who pitched two innings and took the loss in Tuesday’s 4-2 loss to New York.

Dunn issued a leadoff single to Buck before retiring the next three batters to end the game.

“That was his inning,” Redmond said. “We want him to go out there and not have a guy warming up in the bullpen behind him and let him take that inning and see what he could do.

“He did a great job.”

Marisnick homered off of Jenrry Mejia (1-1) in the second inning to give the Marlins a 1-0 lead. He was hitting .179 (5 for 28) in his first eight games before the home run.

“It was honestly the farthest thing from my mind,” said Marisnick, who initially received the customary silent treatment from his teammates in the dugout after the home run.

Mejia gave up three runs in six innings.

Eric Young nearly matched Marisnick’s homer in the third inning, but his long drive to center field hit the top of the fence and stayed in play. Umpires used video replay and upheld the original call, giving Young a triple.

He was stranded at third base.

“I thought it came off the wall funny,” Mets manager Terry Collins said. “That’s why I went out. (Second base umpire) Andy Fletcher said, ‘I know it came off the wall funny. We’ll take a look at it.'”

Redmond had no complaints about the call.

“I think they got it right,” he said.

The Marlins added to their lead in the bottom half of the third inning with back-to-back sacrifice flies by Polanco and Stanton that made it 3-0.

New York broke through against Alvarez with an RBI double by Ike Davis in the sixth. It was the first run allowed by Alvarez in 18 innings, the longest streak by a Marlins pitcher this season.

Young led off the eighth with a walk and advanced to third on a ground ball to Polanco at third. Alvarez was relieved by Chad Qualls, and Young scored on a passed ball to pull the Mets within 3-2.

“I was just playing the percentages, who was at third base and who was at first base,” Young said of his alert baserunning. “I felt good about going.”

David Wright singled, stole second, and advanced to third on a fly out. Dunn came in for Qualls and got pinch-hitter Josh Satin to fly out to left to end the inning.

(TM and © Copyright 2013 CBS Radio Inc. and its relevant subsidiaries. CBS RADIO and EYE Logo TM and Copyright 2013 CBS Broadcasting Inc. Used under license. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed. The Associated Press contributed to this report.)

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