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Low Flying Plane? It’s Killing Mosquitos!

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The body of a female mosquito fills up and balloons as she sucks blood from a photographer's hand at Everglades National Park August 12, 2002 in Flamingo, Florida. The female bugs use the blood protein to feed their eggs then lays the eggs in water. The itch from the bite is caused by the human body's immune system responding to the mosquito's saliva.  (Photo by Tom Ervin/Getty Images)

The body of a female mosquito fills up and balloons as she sucks blood from a photographer’s hand at Everglades National Park August 12, 2002 in Flamingo, Florida. The female bugs use the blood protein to feed their eggs then lays the eggs in water. The itch from the bite is caused by the human body’s immune system responding to the mosquito’s saliva. (Photo by Tom Ervin/Getty Images)

World's Largest Passenger Plane

MIAMI (CBSMIami) – That buzzing you hear tonight as you try to doze of may not be the hum of a pesky mosquito flitting around your face; it could be the hum of an airplane doing battle with millions of the pesky critters, as Miami-Dade breaks with practice and holds an unusual night-time mosquito spraying.

The county announced the plans Monday as complaints continue to rise. Recent rainy weather has caused the mosquito population to bloom, something that can cause problems to people headed to cookouts and 4th of fireworks celebrations.

Normally spraying is done in the early morning hours, but nighttime spraying allows the county another whack at the population.

According to county officials, what may startle people the most is how low the planes fly. People in spraying areas could see planes just 350 feet off the ground and might be startled into thinking the plane is in trouble, but they said that is perfectly normal for spraying operations.

If you raise bees, the county said you should keep them covered during spraying operations. If you have allergies or sensitivity to pesticides, the spraying planners suggest you stay inside.

Residents are advised that aircraft will be flying as low as 350 feet.  Beekeepers are asked to keep their bees covered during the spraying operations in their particular area.  Individuals with known allergic reactions should remain indoors.

People who have questions about the aerial spraying, or complaints about mosquitoes, can call the County’s 311 Answer Center.

Miami-Dade residents can help reduce the nuisance caused by mosquitoes by remembering the “five Ds:”

 ▪    Dusk and Dawn—avoid being outdoors when mosquitoes are most active.
    ▪    Dress—wear long, loose, light-colored clothing that covers the skin.
    ▪    DEET—use mosquito repellants that contain DEET
    ▪    Drainage—eliminate standing water around the home in places such as buckets, cans, old tires, and plant containers.

 

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