Metromover Station Renamed To Honor County’s First African-American Judge

MIAMI (CBSMiami) – Miami-Dade has a new Metromover station, sort of. It’s not actually a new station but a station which was renamed Wednesday to honor the county’s first African-American judge.

In a ceremony Wednesday, Miami-Dade County officials including Mayor Carlos Gimenez, renamed the Arena/State Plaza Metromover station the Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr. Station in honor of the late judge.

In 1976, Wilkie D. Ferguson became the first African-American to serve as a judge in the Dade County Circuit Court. Upon his appointment to the Third District Court of Appeal in 1980, Judge Ferguson became the first African-American to serve on that court.

“By renaming one of our Metromover stations after Judge Ferguson, we honor a remarkable public servant whose landmark rulings helped improve the quality of life for thousands of Florida residents,” said Miami-Dade Transit Director Ysela Llort.

judge wilkie ferguson Metromover Station Renamed To Honor Countys First African American Judge

(Source: Judge Wilkie D. Ferguson, Jr.

Judge Ferguson served on the Third District Court of Appeal until 1993, when former President Bill Clinton nominated him to serve as a United States District Court Judge. Judge Ferguson served as a federal judge until his passing in 2003.

The new federal courthouse  in downtown Miami was also named in honor of Judge Ferguson.

  • jw

    It’s enlightening to see the commitment of public service rewarded to the Ferguson’s and their family. Former Metro-Dade County Commissioner Betty T. Ferguson (Judge Ferguson’s wife) served well, and has a community center in North Dade named in her honor. Judge Ferguson has a Federal courthouse building with an adjoining Metromover Station named in his honor, well deserved. Although his visibility in the public on a daily basis wasn’t as prominent as his wife’s – mainly because of media attention from commission and community meetings, ribbon cuttings, and her commitment to District 1. Judge Ferguson’s professional stature carried more weight than given attention. I remember him speaking to a group of us at an event. He was having a conversation with someone and once his name was mention – the person said – “Oh, you’re the husband of Commissioner Ferguson!” He was humble, a giant, and now only an internet search away – where the history books in the Clouds will always remind those that remember him as an icon, and a click away from those who want to know him as a public servant and family man. JW

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