Former Dolphin Ronnie Brown Takes Anti-Violence Message To The Kids

MIAMI (CBS4) – Every week we seem to hear about incidents where teens acted violently toward other teens, sometimes with tragic consequences.

In an effort to get the word out that these types of acts have to stop, former Miami Dolphin running back/current free agent Ronnie Brown is getting up close and personal with high school students.

“We try to prevent these things that are happening in the school systems, where you get the shootings and violent acts toward one another,” said Brown.

On Tuesday Brown teamed up with members of the Anti-Defamation League and visited Miami’s Killian High School. Freshman Melissa Morin said she knows the ‘battle of bullying’ all too well.

“Ever since I was in elementary school I always got picked on for something,” Morin said.

These days social media is playing a larger role in teen bullying.

“Unfortunately with these media outlets as Facebook and Twitter I think there’s more of an opportunity to bully one another or cause these situations,” Brown said.

“The hardest part was in middle school when they made a Facebook page about me. About fifty kids created it, middle school was hard,” Morin said.

Junior Genesis Guerra’s struggle with youth violence literally hits home.

“I use to bully my little sister. Every time I talk about it I still cry,” Guerra said. “We had therapy and talked it out and I got to see her point of view.”

Ronnie Brown, who was number 23 when he played for the ‘Fins, is touring high schools throughout South Florida informing students on his 23 ways to stop youth violence.

While one of those ways is to walk away from an escalating situation, Brown doesn’t plan to walk away from getting his anti-youth violence message out to as many kids as he can reach.

“It’s giving them options rather than resorting to violence to handle their situations, (and their) problems with one another,” Brown said.

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  • J. Randolph

    Football players are the most violent people in society. Basketball players are second. At least when there is b-ball or football it keeps the players from going on crime sprees.

  • Melissa Marie Morin

    I would personally like to thank EVERYONE of CBS 4 who came for our interviews, and did the filming! As a student leader, I felt VERY honored to have them come to broadcast our symposium at Miami Killian with Ronnie Brown! Myself, and my other two student leaders were very thankful that this ADL symposium went so smoothly, and that with the help of not only the ADL, the Ronnie Brown project, but all the programs that we have going forward at Killian, that we were able to send out a positive message to other schools, and show that we can help make a difference, and come up with resolutions to violence and bullying in our schools and in the greater community.

    Thank you SO MUCH!!!!

  • yokolee

    Good luck and God bless

  • Carol

    This is wonderful but the children have to listen and fully understand what violence does where they live but these children have to have more respect for their parents that is where everything starts not when they are in even in pre-school because that is when you can see if a childern have violent tendencies.

    I was taught over and over again:

    Treat People As You Would Want To Be Treated!!!

    Respect of Person Place and Thing!!!

    If people would live by those simple rules there would be NO violence at all so simple but so true.

  • Main Paul

    Diseases of the soul are more dangerous and more numerous than those of the body.

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